Category Archives for "News"

February 6, 2017

Did You Know? Seatbelt Edition

Did you know?...2% of children involved in car accidents in South Carolina were NOT wearing seat belts when the accident occurred!

Did you know?...​More than half of the people killed in car accidents in South Carolina were NOT wearing seat belts!

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January 24, 2017

Where to Stop at a Stop Sign

When approaching a stop sign, South Carolina law requires drivers to stop before the crosswalk, stop bar, or the nearest point where you have a view of approaching traffic. (SC Code 56-5-2740).

August 11, 2016

6 Rules for Approaching a Stopped School Bus +Video

Schools across South Carolina will begin their new year in the next couple of weeks. That means schools busses will be picking up and dropping off children before and after school. Here are six rules on when to stop and when to go when approaching a stopped school bus.

  1. Flashing Red Lights. You only have to stop for a school bus if it is flashing its red lights. Additionally, if a school bus is flashing its amber lights, you can't pass it.
  2. Approaching From Behind. Always stop for a school bus flashing its red lights if you are approaching the bus from behind.
  3. Approaching From Opposite Direction. Always stop for a school bus that is flashing its red lights if you are driving in the opposite direction on any road less than four lanes.
  4. Four Lanes or More. When approaching a school bus that is flashing its red lights in the opposite direction, do not stop if you are on a road that is four lanes or larger.
  5. Begin Moving. You can begin moving again once the bus begins moving or when the bus turns off its flashing lights.
  6. Median or Middle Lanes. Always stop when approaching a school bus that is flashing its red lights in the opposite direction when driving on a two-lane road, even if a median or middle lane divides the road.

Free Consumer Guide

If you have been injured in a car accident, you need a Battle Plan.

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June 9, 2016

5 Ways to Reduce Your Summer Car Crash Risk

It’s summer. The air is warm and the sky is blue. It’s time for a road trip.

Weather you are traveling to visit family or your favorite vacation spot, you and millions of others will hit the road this summer. Unfortunately, July and August are the most dangerous months to use the roadways.

While you can’t control other drivers, there are a few things you can do to reduce your risk of being in a crash.

1. Get a Tune-up.

Have your car checked out at your trusted shop. Make sure your brakes are working well. Check your tires for wear. Replace your tires if worn and don’t try to get out additional miles. Waiting too long could mean an increased stopping distance with worn tires.

2. Turn Off Your Phone

I’ve written about the dangers of distracted driving before. Its best to turn off your phone so all of your attention is directed to your driving. You never know when that extra ½ a second could help you avoid a potential crash.

3. Wear Your Seat Belt

All the safety systems in today’s modern vehicles rely on seat belt use. Your air bags will not be as affective if you don’t. Additionally, your seat belt could be the only thing that will keep you in the vehicle and not flying out a window in a bad crash.

4. Slow Down

I’m not saying you should drive below the speed limit on a clear and sunny day. I am saying you probably should not be driving 20 miles above the speed limit in the rain. Slow down, pass with care, and get to your designation safely.

5. Avoid the Fast Lane

It seems that some drivers believe traveling in the fast lane gives them a license to tailgate the vehicle in front of them. That is dangerous and asking for a crash. Avoid that problem by using the middle and right lanes when possible. Additionally, using the middle lane provides more pathways for emergency maneuvers.

I hope you never experience the horror of terrible car crash. I hope the above tips reduce your risk and you have a safe and fun summer. However, if you have been injured in a car cash and would like to tell us your story, please contact us below.

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Faces of Distracted Driving

Erica Forney, 9

Erica Forney was a 9 year old riding her bike around her neighborhood. She was killed by her neighbor who looked down at her cell phone. Here is Erica's story as told by her mother.

Casey Feldman, 21

Casey Feldman was killed by a distracted driver as she was crossing the street in a crosswalk in Ocean City, New Jersey. Here is Casey's story as told by her friends and family.

John Sligting, 56

John Sligting was killed by a teenage driver who was talking on her cell phone, rolled though a stop sign, and hit John's motorcycle. Here is John's story as told by his daughter.

Ashley Johnson, 16

Ashley Johnson was killed when she lost control of her vehicle, crossed the center line, and hit another car head-on. She was texting at the time of the crash. Here is Ashley's story as told by her father.

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April 7, 2016

Disturbing Distracted Driving Trends that Kill

Distracted driving kills 8 people and injures another 1,161 per day in the United States. April is distracted driving awareness month. The Brian R. Murphy Law Firm wants you to be aware of the dangerous risks associated with distracted driving.

"Distracted driving kills 8 people and injures another 1,161 per day

Distraction.gov estimates that 660,000 people are using their phones or electronic devices while driving at any daylight moment in the United States. Texting while driving is like driving blind for the distance of a football field. That’s enough time to cause all kinds of mayhem.

"Texting while driving is like driving blind for the distance of a football field

An estimated 25% of all car crashes involved distracted drivers. In 2014, distracted driving killed 3,179 and injured 431,000.00 , up 10% from 2013. The worst part is that drivers under 20 years old are the most at risk for distraction-related fatalities.

"drivers are posting pictures from their cell phone while driving

Now a more disturbing practice is trending: drivers are posting pictures from their cell phone while driving. You can check it out for yourself by searching for the hashtag #whiledriving on social media. Check out this news report below.

Talk with your family this month about distracted driving. Start the conversation and share these statistics. Also, stay tuned during the month as we share additional stories, solutions, and resources. Sign up for our newsletter below to get these delivered to your inbox or like our page on Facebook.

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If you have been injured by a distracted driver and would like to tell us your story, please contact us below.

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February 4, 2016

Cam Newton’s Success Secret: From Car Accident to Super Bowl

“Somebody is supposed to be dead,” Cam Newton said after the accident. He shouldn’t be alive.

In 2014 Newton’s truck overturned after a driver clipped the rear of his Dodge Ram. The images are horrible. We all wondered how anyone survived. Cam Newton fractured two bones in his lower back.

However, the most lasting impact of the crash seems to be Newton’s on-field performance and not his injured body. The Carolina Panther’s haven’t lost a regular season home game since his crash.

Newton’s teammates praise his leadership. His happiness and joy overflow. He is dominant on the football field.

These successes are a glaring contrast from the previous season. Before the crash, the Charlotte Observer published a column claiming that he wasn’t worth his $100 million contract. His performance was faltering. His passer rating was 47.2, Newton’s career low.

How did Cam Newton turn around his performance so quickly? I believe the answer is his attitude. Cam Newton did these three things right after the crash.

First, he gave thanks.

After the crash Cam Newton said, “I’m just blessed, man. Sometimes you get asked questions and you're speechless. You're just here in this moment, because I'm so happy to one, walk away from it, but also see so much blessings be rained upon me."

Next, he got back to work.

Cam was back at Bank of America stadium the day after he was released from the hospital. No, he wasn’t 100%. He was getting treatment on his back, but he was also at quarterback meetings, according to press accounts.

Finally, he had fun.

Teammate, Jerricho Cotchery explains Can Newton’s success, saying he “ just [had] a great mindset about life and keep pushing. Next thing you know he’s dabbin.’”

Cam Newton didn’t credit new supplements, updated playbooks, or even increased strength. He gave thanks, got back to work, and had fun. The main reason that Cam Newton has gone from his worst season to MVP contender the next season is his mental attitude.

Experiencing an injury after a car accident can be life changing. People can have the best treatment, the best doctors, and a complete physical recovery. However, the biggest contributor to your comeback success is your mental attitude. Remember, give thanks, get back to work, and have fun.

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May 26, 2015

Help Reduce Teen Crashes, Traffic Tip Tuesday

Car Crashes are the #1 killer of teens. Remember that Safety is not an accident; it is a process of good decisions.

With the privilege of driving comes the responsibility to make safe choices. Safe choices include paying attention to the road. 58% of teens involved in traffic collisions are distracted. Summer is the most deadly season for teens.

Good driving decisions for teenagers include putting their mobile phones down, limiting the number of passengers, and keeping their eyes on the road and hands on the wheel.

Talk with your teen about safe driving decisions. Make the above rules mandatory for them to keep the privilege of driving.

For more information, please visit the National Organization for Youth Safety at www.noys.org. If you have been injured in a crash, please visit my website at www.brianmurphylawyer.com.

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May 19, 2015

Tell Your Teen to Buckle Up, Traffic Tip Tuesday

Car Crashes are the #1 killer of teens. Remember that Safety is not an accident; it is a process of good decisions. One of those good decisions is using your seat belt.

Did you know that 53% of teenage drivers who died in crashes were not wearing seat belts? Additionally, a recent survey found that 25% of teens said they don’t wear their seat belts.

Explain these statistics to your teenage drivers. Tell them that seat belts are an important piece of the vehicle’s safety systems. Tell them you expect them to wear them along with any passengers. After all, it’s the law in South Carolina.

For more information, please visit the National Organization for Youth Safety at www.noys.org. If you have been injured in a crash, please visit my website at www.brianmurphylawyer.com.

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April 21, 2015

Don’t Drive Too Slowly, Traffic Tip Tuesday

I know you have heard me say that speed kills, and it does. However, driving too slowly causes car accidents also. The South Carolina Driver’s License Manual reminds us that driving too slowly can also be dangerous.

The reason is this: When you drive to slowly, traffic backs up behind you. When traffic backs up behind you, some motorists may make dangerous moves to get around you. South Carolina has minimum speed laws in addition to maximum speed limits.

Remember to maintain the speed of the traffic around you No, that doesn’t give you a license to speed. You should go with the flow of traffic as long as you are not speeding.

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